Apr 24 2015

Three Signs You Shouldn’t Be Squatting

A heavy squat is possible the most impressive thing you’ll see that the gym. Sitting deep with a couple of 100 kilos on your back makes everyone stop and stare.  There are infinite benefits to the movement: Increased strength (upper and lower), it’s ‘s a great muscle builder, it helps…

A heavy squat is possible the most impressive thing you’ll see that the gym. Sitting deep with a couple of 100 kilos on your back makes everyone stop and stare.  There are infinite benefits to the movement: Increased strength (upper and lower), it’s ‘s a great muscle builder, it helps keep your hips supple and it’s a killer calorie burner.  Infact, they have traced a lot of common back and hip problems down to modern chairs and toilets, and the fact that we are no longer used to bending below parallel.

squatting

There are so many benefits to the squat that many fitness pros will prescribe the exercise to everybody that steps into the weight area.  But not everyone should squat – especially those whose mobility is similar to that of a curled up dead spider!

Many poor personal trainers and Crossfit coaches seem to taking this one step further and are inviting clients of all ages and abilities to get stuck into Olympic Lifting. Just a note to remember – if your PT is teaching you Olympic Lifting… fire them!  Trainers should not teach Olympic Lifting – Strength and Conditioning coaches should.

So, here’s how to tell whether squatting is right for you, or whether you should leave the squatting to someone else…. (for the time being)

1. You can’t grip the bar. If you need to develop some kind of hook hand to barely balance the bar on your middle finger. STOP! When that bar slips it’s taking your precious finger with it. Work on opening your shoulders before you even think about putting that bar on your back again.  I’d recommend a therapist does this for you, it’s very difficult to open up your posture on your own.  I suggest seeing a massage, ART or Fascial Stretch Therapist.

2. Your knees cave in, making you look like you’re trying to stop yourself peeing due to exertion. Stay tight all the way through the movement – twist you’re feet in your shoes and  force your knees wide. If you can’t, drop the weight and try again.  When you can do all weight without your knees caving in, move up in weight.

3. You can’t get close to 90 degrees. A shallow squat is just plain embarrassing, although it is amusing to everyone else in the gym. Drop the weight and force yourself to go lower, if that doesn’t work, try hip and ankle mobility.

Kindly I’ve posted a quick video here, this stretch is especially good if you get back soreness from bending – great for all you reluctant gardeners.

To perform:

A.  Enter the lunge postition with your trailing leg behind your body

B.  Clamp your foot down and push out the knee with your elbow

C.  Make circles with your knee as you lift your chest and try to drop your hips

NB You should may feel this in your hip, hamstring, glute and adductor (groin).  Continue for 2-3 minutes.

A technically proficient squat is the best exercise for overall athletic development the cure for non specific back-pain (which accounts for pretty much all back pain that hasn’t been caused by trauma.)  If if you canont squat, you need to spend time working on your mobility so you can reap it’s benefits.

When You’re Ready To Get Serious

Sal

Author

Salman